Alan Ferber on “Flow”

We conclude our transcription series with a beautiful solo by Alan Ferber on “Flow”, the fifth movement of Roots and Transitions. “Flow” has also been nominated for a Grammy award for Best Instrumental Composition!  For our analysis, we explore Ferber’s use of duple groupings over 3/4.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.

 

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Jon Gordon on “Cycles”

“Cycles” is the final movement of Roots and Transitions and features alto saxophonist Jon Gordon. The main solo section is an open form loosely centered in Ab and Gordon creates an improvisation that is deeply tied to the motivic material of Roots and Transitions. Our analysis considers how Gordon develops intervals from the melody as motivic material for his improvisations.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.

Charles Pillow on “Perspective”

“Perspective”, the sixth movement of Roots and Transitions, features the low voices of the ensemble including bass clarinetist Charles Pillow. Using the melody as a springboard, Pillow creates a lyrical and poised improvisation that showcases his sensitivity and control. Our analysis will focus on the relationship between the melody and Pillow’s improvisation.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.

John Ellis on “Wayfarer”

“Wayfarer” illustrates impeccable motivic unity and melodic construction. Taking the first solo, John Ellis’ improvisation is not only lyrical and swinging, but also extends and develops the motives of the melody. Our analysis examines how Ellis uses motives from the melody in his solo.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.

 

Nate Radley on “Clocks”

Nate Radley follows Jon Gordon’s solo with an improvisation that deftly navigates the challenges of this unorthodox form and illustrates Radley’s exceptional command of contemporary harmony. For our analysis section, we examine his approach to altered chords.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.

 

Jon Gordon on “Clocks”

The stability and calm of “Quiet Confidence” is answered by the rhythmic and harmonic dissonance of “Clocks”. The first solo opens with a powerful statement from alto player Jon Gordon. Our analysis considers the harmonic peculiarities of “Clocks” and looks at how Gordon navigates this progression.

Click here for the transcription and analysis.

To find this recording, click here. To find the score, click here.